Press

News about Aerobo's activities as a leader in the professional drone industry.

Recent Coverage

  • The newest broadcast technology for the Red Bull Crashed Ice series came via a drone from Aerobo, a company that specializes in live sports photography and cinematography.

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  • Aerial Cinematography company, Aerobo teamed up with director Paul Trillo to raise the bar for drone cinematography with an 10-minute long scene that was shot entirely in one shot.

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  • When general managers, news directors and other responsible television personnel turn in for the evening, Jon Ollwerther, chief marketing officer at drone maker and on-demand service provider Aerobo, wants them to snooze without a care — at least when it comes to the news drones they deploy.

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  • On the banks of the East River, across 35 acres of land and comprised of some 16 buildings is Industry City, the largest privately owned industrial complex in New York. Inside this Brooklyn innovation ecosystem is a diverse concentration of more than 400 companies (and growing!) that tinker, build, create and design. Get a snapshot of the movers and shakers at this Sunset Park outpost by reading about some of the innovators who call Industry City home.

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  • At the Center for the Study of the Drone

    From April 11 to 15, the United Nations Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons convened hundreds of delegates from member states and non-governmental organizations for its third annual meeting to debate lethal autonomous weapons. Here’s a summary of what was discussed and what wasn’t.

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  • Every day, we are introduced to yet another mind-blowing way to use a drone. Earlier last week, we met a fisherman who uses drones to catch tuna in Australia. This time, we’re given a good look at the vibrant artwork and craft of Paul Trillo, a Brooklyn-based artist and filmmaker.

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  • Filmmaker Paul Trillo’s latest project, Chromaticity, is the perfect combination of technology and art that works together to create something beautiful and breathtaking. Using drones fitted with colored smoke bombs, Trillo, with the help of his friend Brian Streem of Aerobo, filmed them dancing in flight, creating bursts of color that fill the sky. By filming the smoke trailing through the sky and removing the drones in post-production, Trillo was able to produce the illusion of smoke seemingly twisting and weaving in a choreographed dance without any type of aide.

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  • So you wanna fly a drone in New York? You just might be able to
    Commercial drones could transform industries from movies to real estate—if only they were legal…

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  • Integrated Microwave Technologies (IMT), a leader in advanced digital microwave systems serving the broadcast, sports, entertainment and law enforcement markets, will be highlighting its microLite – Aerial Transmitter, designed to be integrated into Aerobo’s Micro Unmanned Aerial System, known as the Mini, at NAB 2016 (Booth C1321). Aerobo, which designs, builds and operates drones for clients in news, TV, sports, advertising, as well as cinema and inspection, will be showcasing its newest drone at IMT’s booth throughout the upcoming NAB show.

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  • Drones take flight for news and sports broadcasters
    Apr. 08, 2016 – 2:33 – Engineers are trying to create smaller drones that carry live video streams for broadcasters, which could change how we watch events.

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  • Looks like drones can add yet another skill to their expansive resume: making rainbows. Director Paul Trillo has crafted a mesmerizing short film, Chromaticity, that essentially turns the sky into a bleeding canvas of glorious Technicolor and wonder, all thanks to drones and smoke grenades. Utilizing four drones, including DJI Phantom and DJI Inspire drones, Trillo and his team, aided by Aerobo, a company that designs and operates drones for various applications, including filmmaking purposes, took to the sky above the Jersey Shore and made it their canvass, saturating it with colored smoke grenades.

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  • For his new short film “Chromaticity,” director Paul Trillo turned the sky into his giant canvas by strapping smoke grenades to DJI camera drones.

    “Using 3 DJI Phantoms, a DJI Inspire and hundreds of smoke grenades, we painted the sky in technicolor,” Trillo says. The film is an “ethereal flight over the ocean as mysterious colored smoke leaves its mark across the sky. A beautiful choreography between four drones simultaneously in flight and hundreds of smoke grenades.”

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  • It’s flying colors! Paul Trillo’s Chromaticity cleverly choreographed four drones to fly across the sky and leave smoke of color against the backdrop of the endless ocean. The effect is pretty awesome to see because the smoke grenades cover the drone and make it seem as if it’s just a team of superheroes flying together. Or like some invisible force pushing colors around. Or really, just a fun and colorful-as-hell video to watch.

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  • Soaring over the open sea, three colored smoke clouds wind their way through the sky like meteorites that forgot to follow the laws of gravity. Actually, they’re drones, each spouting gaseous bursts of red, yellow, and green under the direction of filmmaker Paul Trillo for his latest work, CHROMATICITY.

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  • Vimeo – Staff Pick

    London Drone Film Festival – Technical Award
    Interdrone Film Festival – Best Music Video Award
    NY Drone Film Festival – Official Selection
    US Drone Film Festival – Official Selection

    “CHROMATICITY” – the quality of a color as determined by its dominant wavelength and its purity.

    An ethereal flight over the ocean as mysterious colored smoke leaves its mark across the sky. A beautiful choreography between four drones simultaneously in flight and hundreds of smoke grenades. To learn more, watch the behind the scenes:

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  • In San Francisco, California, high school students are using their STEM skills to put together the first off Broadway production of School Of Rock. We check out how drones are changing media, as well as enabling students in New Jersey to lend a helping hand in their community.

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  • Micro drones are hot in the drone marketplace, as investors anticipate the passage of micro drone regulations.

    While the regulatory environment for commercial drone applications like drone delivery remain unclear, the FAA’s move towards risk-based classifications and the micro drone classifications proposed in FAA Reauthorization packages are leading drone investors rushing to search for opportunities in the tiny drone market.

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  • AUSTIN—The federal government and private partners still have lots of work to do to integrate drone aircraft into the national airspace system, but the process is moving faster than many skeptics thought possible, FAA Administrator Michael Huerta said this week.

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  • FAA Administrator Michael Huerta and Sally French, “The Drone Girl,” today led a lively panel discussion about the future of small unmanned aircraft at South by Southwest (SXSW) in Austin on Monday. The panel included a diverse group of innovative thinkers from industry and government.

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  • On Monday New York City based drone startup, Aerobo, is unveiling a Micro UAS designed specifically for the broadcast television industry. Aerobo is releasing the drone in Austin, Texas at the Google Fiber Pavilion with FAA Administrator Michael Huerta and Senior Advisor for UAS Integration Marke “Hoot” Gibson, during the South by Southwest festival.

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  • AUSTIN, TEXAS—Amongst the music and films that make up the annual South by Southwest festival, New York-based startup Aerobo will launch its new Micro Unmanned Aerial System that it says it specifically designed for the broadcast TV industry. The drone will be unveiled Monday, March 14, at the Google Fiber Pavilion with FAA Administrator Michael Huerta and UAS Integration Senior Advisor Marke “Hoot” Gibson.

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  • A Brooklyn company is looking to become a major player in the multibillion-dollar drone industry. It designs and manufactures drones used for aerial photography – including movie shoots. NY1’s Michael Herzenberg filed the following report.

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  • After years of being cast as robotic messengers of death and high-altitude spies, drones are getting new roles as kids’ toys, Hollywood cameras, and even airborne roof inspectors. Noncommercial drones can roam the open skies of suburbia at will, as long as they comply with FAA regulations (stay below 400 feet and at least five miles from the closest airport), but in dense cities they could be at once hugely useful and potentially dangerous.

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  • Drones are the must-have gift on many lists this Christmas, and they are literally flying off the shelves.
    But if you’re not careful, flying a drone can get you in serious trouble.
    INSIDE EDITION has tips on what you need to know before flying a drone this holiday season.

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  • We’re a few months away from Time magazine’s “Person of the Year” issue, but a strong case could be made for the drone landing that coveted title for 2015. (Yes, a drone is not a person, but the computer won the honor back in 1982, so it’s not unprecedented.)

    Drones have stormed our newsfeeds, headlines and timelines this year in numerous ways.

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  • The Second Avenue subway in New York City is no longer a pipe dream.

    One section is set to open in December 2016 and is expected to carry about 200,000 riders a day, about the same number who use the entire 17-mile-long subway system in Los Angeles, reports CBS News correspondent Don Dahler.

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  • Drones are hard to categorize. The drones (hardware) themselves are multi purpose and can be used as a tool for any function. I categorized them based on how each drone company talked about themselves on their home page (see the areas under “commercial”).

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  • At around 5 p.m. this evening, New York’s first FAA-licensed drone company launched a massive hand-made drone into the skies above Brooklyn’s Industry City. But that doesn’t mean there wasn’t also a swarm of unlicensed drones already aloft.

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  • WASHINGTON — Federal regulations are making it tough for commercial drone firms to keep flying high, a Brooklyn businessman told Congress Wednesday.

    Brian Streem, CEO of AeroCine, which operates drones for makers of feature films and commercials, told the House Small Business Committee that more needs to be done beyond the relaxed regulations proposed in February.

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  • Startup drone makers are finding record amounts of funding as venture capitalists prowl for early winners in what may become an $82 billion industry.

    From Silicon Valley to New York, firms including Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, Lightspeed Venture Partners and ff Venture Capital are lining up behind unmanned aerial vehicle companies. Google Inc., General Electric Co. and Qualcomm Inc. also are jumping in with cash.

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  • Friday, May 15, 2015
    JONES BEACH (WABC) — Eyewitness News is always exploring new ways of bringing you the news through television, the internet and social media and now from above through the technology of drones.

    Drones, equipped with a high definition camera, are entering the news gathering arena, and now for the first time being used by Eyewitness News.

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  • The winners of the 1st Annual New York City Drone Film Festival were announced live at a ceremony at the Directors Guild of America Theater on March 7, 2015. Filmmaker Randy Scott Slavin told Indiewire that he started the film festival with the intention of reducing the stigma from drones. “The festival is about the drones we use for art,” he said.

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  • It’s a drizzly Saturday night and I’m ushered down to the basement of the Directors Guild Theater, crammed between fellow reporters, bulky camera lenses, and a red rope barrier. I’m at the first annual New York City Drone Film Festival, and there are a ton of people here. After briefly chatting on the phone with festival founder Randy Scott Slavin a couple of months ago, here I am, unexpectedly overwhelmed by buzzing press, filmmakers, and fans who are obsessively supporting the budding art of making short films with aerodynamic, unmanned cameras. The energy is ecstatic, with CNBC and Fox News teams prepping their weekend reporters with red carpet questions like, “What are you flying?”…

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  • The dawn of drone cinema is upon us. And the views will blow your mind.

    Inside a storied Manhattan theater on Saturday night, the New York City Drone Film Festival, billed as the first of its kind, debuted to a packed house. Thirty-five finalist films were screened — each shorter than five minutes and bracketed into nine categories between blessedly short award speeches.

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  • Look up, because the New York Drone Film Festival has descended upon the city that never sleeps. The Fallout is drone cinematography outfit AeroCine’s entry into the festival’s inaugural lineup, a drone’s-eye-view of the Chernobyl-ravaged city of Pripyat, Ukraine in the winter. The Drone Film Festival bills itself as having “the best of drone cinema,” and The Fallout lives up to that claim: while some aerial films fall victim to motion-blur and shakiness, AeroCine’s short is smooth like butter as it juxtaposes the Soviet-era crumbling amusement park and apartment buildings of the city against a blanket of white, deceptively safe-looking snow.

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